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City Kitties Windermere Fire Cat Interview [Feb. 21st, 2011|11:18 am]
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Lou from City Kitties talking about their efforts to rescue pets trapped in a burned out building. They learned an awful lot about how long pets can survive abandoned in structures like this after people are gone. Surprising that firefighters and other professionals had no idea that anything could have lived through the fire. Not only did some survive, but almost all of them did. The last cat rescued from the building made it 39 days on his own in a basement flooded with fifteen feet of water. Without City Kitties heroic efforts they all would have died alone. The world is a better place because they're here.

City Kitties can always use donations, but more important are foster homes. If you have space in your heart and your house you can apply to foster here. And if you live far away, be kind to something today, help a cat or a dog or a horse or a ferret or a bird or a goat or a skunk or a turtle in your neighborhood or lend a word of encouragement to people who do. & Spay and neuter. & don't buy a cat or dog from a pet store. Rah rah rah.







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Comments:
[User Picture]From: tsarina
2011-02-21 04:33 pm (UTC)

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My kitties came from a rescue group. I love them so much.
[User Picture]From: thespian
2011-02-21 05:23 pm (UTC)

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I feel so horrible, though, about the cats who probably died, alone and scared and certain they were abandoned, because people who didn't know cats insisted they couldn't possibly have lived.

I've lived in a building that had a huge fire - it was fortunately contained on the 3rd floor, to one apartment (it was so bad that fire was shooting 3-4 feet out the window). I lived on the 9th, and my cats were fortunately never in danger (which is good, because the second the building alarms went off, I had no chance of getting their little rumps into their carriers).

It angers me to think that this might be a standard method/perception for post-fire care. How can I find out what local practices are around here (Boston area; I'm in Quincy), and are there any ideas for putting together an educational piece to make sure that firefighters and city workers are informed fully about the difference quick trapping would make?
[User Picture]From: katemckinnon
2011-02-21 05:50 pm (UTC)

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I'm so glad that through the persistence of City Kitties and the people who cared and posted and called and retweeted, some little lives got saved.

Our friend Cynthia Fawcett just fostered a mom and litter of five kittens in Toronto, and was enriched by it immeasurably. And now has a slinky black mama cat to love.
From: addieplum
2011-02-21 06:57 pm (UTC)

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the city kitties women are so amazing. you donating to their art show this year? i haven't heard yet if there's a date set.
[User Picture]From: gaminette
2011-02-21 10:48 pm (UTC)

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Bravo to City Kitties and to you, Kyle, for tweeting and posting about it. I've been following the story and was horrified. It reminded me of the time some years ago (early '90s or so?) when a crane collapsed against a building in Times Square in the middle of the day. The building was evacuated of people, but by the time those who were away at work arrived, no one was allowed in the building, not even to get their pets. There was a pretty big uproar from the public and some people risked arrest snuck into the building to rescue their fluffy family members. Unbelievable.
[User Picture]From: lois2037
2011-02-21 11:39 pm (UTC)

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I remember the Oakland, CA fire, when 3,000 houses were burned, most of them to their foundations. Somehow a great many cats survived even through something like that. They found tiny safe places to ride it out. Many of their humans never even bothered to come back and look for them, but there were also a great many miraculous and joyful reunions, even up to a year afterward.

All our cats are tamed ferals or rescued throw-aways that have found their way to our door one way or another. It is an amazing thing to make a connection with a wild animal and win his or her trust. Knowing you've saved a beautiful life is the least of the rewards you get from this. One caution about fostering: we did this once, about 11 years ago. He was a tiny, fuzzy kitten found in the back yard behind a pet food store. I said, "Sure. We'll foster him. It'll be easy and fun!" He's still here! Thats his charming picture in the icon. :- D If you foster, you may well find a life-long friend.
[User Picture]From: howlokitty
2011-02-22 04:41 am (UTC)

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I would like to point out that some pet shops have adoption days. I got Serious Black through an adoption day through an animal rescue group and a pet store. He was in a litter of cats that was being methodically killed by the owner until someone stepped in and managed to save two of the kittens. He's my special needs kitty, and I love him.
[User Picture]From: elizaeffect
2011-02-22 03:48 pm (UTC)

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Yes yes yes, this. My foster group does these at a Petco in Northern Virginia every few weeks, and the store hosts other groups on the weeks we're not there. If interested people call their local stores they can probably get schedules.

Hugging my foster kitty today in celebration of City Kitties' awesome work.

(Obligatory foster group plug for those in DC area: http://www.fourpaws.org )