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It's all about the dress - if you can't be witty, then at least be bombastic [entries|archive|friends|userinfo]
kyle cassidy

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It's all about the dress [Mar. 25th, 2015|06:21 am]
kyle cassidy
[mood |accomplishedaccomplished]





Elizabeth Willing Powel was a Philadelphia socialite, intellectual and moralist. Wife of the mayor of Philadelphia, she hosted out of state delegates in her home during the first Continental Congress and became a close confidant of George Washington. She is credited, among other things, with convincing Washington to accept a second term as president after he had decided to retire.






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[User Picture]From: lawbabeak
2015-03-26 02:45 am (UTC)
Awesome!
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[User Picture]From: netmouse
2015-03-26 02:04 pm (UTC)
Looks gorgeous, sounds fascinating!

I am currently reading a 1981 edition of "To the Setting of The Sun:The Story of York, about York PA, where I now live. The author got to page 16 before naming a single woman (Christina Schultz, homesteader, who with her husband John built a two-story stone house). His only acknowledgement that William Penn had a wife and family was to mention that Springettsbury Manor was named in honor of his grandson, who was his heir, and later to name his son and two grandsons.

As of pg 39 he is getting into the Revolution and has named approximately 176 men (including several local historians he has cited), and precisely 7 women, including Mrs. Schultz. Two of the named women were criminals: a handkerchief thief given 15 lashes and a murderess, hanged. The other four are listed as wives, sometimes with details as to whose daughter they were or how many children they had.

It has been so long since I read a history that so completely elides the active participation of women that I find it baffling. It's good to hear that stories that help fill in such horrendous blanks are being told.

Edited at 2015-03-26 02:06 pm (UTC)
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